2014 is quickly becoming known as the year of the broken video game. It seemed like every week a new game would be coming out that had some major bug or flaw that would soon be discussed in length on gaming forums. Whether it was problems with connecting to online matches, frame-rate drops or characters with missing skin, it seemed as though no developer could deliver a finished product.

Then inevitably a new conversation would start. “Remember back when games just worked?” Oh yes, everyone would nod. Those were the days. You pulled out your NES cartridge, slid it into the machine, and the game just worked, no problems. The glory days.

Except those days never existed.

It’s becoming clear that as more time passes, the more people like to wax nostalgic on the early days of gaming. But the truth is that broken video games have been around for as long as there have been video games. Never was there a magical era in which games were released and they all “just worked.”

The Vita is no stranger to broken games at launch. Whether it’s the performance issues of Borderlands 2, the trophy glitches in God of War, or the mountain of problems that Starlight Inception suffered, there is an ever growing list of games that just don’t work the way they should at launch.

OlliOlli is another example of a game that caused enormous frustration when it released. The game suffered from bugs that would tend to crash the game, sending the player back to the Live Area at seemingly random times. Some joked that you never had to close OlliOlli because the game would crash and do it for you.

But eventually the game would get patched. An update was issued that resolved most of those problems, but that’s not possible for some of the broken games of yesteryear. One of the greatest games of all time, the king of the arcade, has brought hours of entertainment to millions of people around the world, yet after 30 years on the market it is still broken. I’m of course referring to Donkey Kong.

DK Kill screen

Donkey Kong is a famous example of a classic that has a game breaking bug programmed into it that will never go away. Due to an oversight in the game’s timing algorithm, Donkey Kong will only allow a player to reach to Level 22. It’s known as the “kill screen” and causes the game to end. The problem is caused by the way the game calculates how much time a player has to finish the level. By the time a player gets to Level 22, the game gives approximately 7 seconds for Jumpman (Mario) to make it to the top. This impossibly short amount of time would only allow the player to get up one ladder before timing out. The result is instant death and the unintentional end of the game.

e.t._atari

During the days of the Atari, broken games were a common occurrence. No game epitomizes this more than E.T. The Extra Terrestrial. Despite its legendary status as one of the most broken games of all time, it wasn’t alone in having game breaking bugs. Games would consistently suffer from bugs and glitches that would make continuing to play all but impossible. You’d just have to hit the reset button and start a new game (praying that the problem wouldn’t happen again).

In fact, there were so many games with huge problems that people got fed up with it. The entire video game industry came to a grinding halt with the crash of 1983. Things didn’t get better until Nintendo came around and addressed the quality of games specifically. Their solution was the Nintendo Seal of Quality, a badge that an approved game could wear, and Nintendo would assure you that it would at least work

The Nintendo Entertainment System however was also not immune to having games with breaking bugs. Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, and Metroid all suffered from bugs that could trap a player in a situation that made progressing impossible. The solution, again, was to hit reset and try it again. They weren’t as perfect as we’d like to remember. Any number of errors would pop up that could instantly end a game. Just Google “NES game glitches” and you will drown in the results.

People may view Nintendo games as “just working” but take a look at this video and you’ll see that their games are just as susceptible to game-breaking bugs as anyone else.

But bugs in the code aren’t the only way a game can be broken at launch. Problems with difficulty balance or unforeseen gameplay mechanics can ruin and break a game even if it doesn’t cause a crash. Quite a number of old NES games were hard. Brutally and unfairly hard. Today these balancing issues would get corrected with a patch (see God of War: Ascension), but back then you were stuck with what you had.

Sometimes a gameplay feature would ruin the game for many. This is the case with MarioKart DS and its “snaking” bug. It gave players who perfected the technique the ability have an endless series of boosts throughout the track. This creates an unfair situation against players who don’t know the technique, and ruins the game. If this was Destiny‘s “cave of loot” it would get patched out, but instead it’s a feature that will forever stay.

Perhaps the biggest game breaking problem for NES games was the media itself. The old cartridges were notorious for corroding quickly or becoming magnets for dust and dirt. This would create screens garbled with a mash-up of letters and numbers. Maybe you’d see Link in there somewhere, but the game was unplayable. The solution? Blow into your cartridge. Then blow into your NES. Then try the cartridge again. Hit reset a few times. Maybe it would start to work, maybe it wouldn’t.

zelda_ii_glitch

Say what you will about the performance issues for Borderlands 2 at launch, but at least I never had to huff and puff just to get the game started.

This isn’t to say that games today are more or less prone to problems than those from the past decades, but the notion that broken games at launch is a new thing is simply ridiculous. Even then, our definition for what “broken” is has changed drastically over the years. The Vita’s version of Jak and Daxter was notorious for its frame-rate issued, but the game was still playable. The same can not be said for Battletoads on the NES, which was so brutally difficult that few would ever make it past the first level. I’d argue that actually makes the game even more broken.

So then why is it we feel that modern games are more “broken” than the games from 30 years ago?

I have to assume that the biggest reason is that we can easily share what we experience in a game with people from all over the world. Whether you talk about a problem in a game in a forum or tweet it out to the world, our ability to broadcast a message is infinitely greater than it was years ago. A few people experience a bug in a game and suddenly it’s assumed that everyone suffers from it.

AC Unity

Remember those infamous screen shots from Assassin’s Creed Unity where the character’s skin was missing? Those pictures made their way around the internet and quickly became the butt of a thousand jokes. How could Ubisoft be so inept as to release a game that broken? What wasn’t talked about was that the missing skin bug was actually very rare. It only effected two specific graphics cards on the PC version only. The fact that the majority of people playing the game would never experience the bug didn’t matter. The picture was worth more than a thousand words.

The fact is we enjoy perhaps the most sophisticated and complex form of media ever created. Unlike books or movies, the interactive experience that video games provide bring with it a million different variables that can (and will) go wrong. The beauty of games today is that they’re not the stale cartridge that shipped in the box. They can be fixed, improved, and expanded upon. Unforeseen issues can be corrected and difficulty issues can be balanced.

Yes, games are released that have missing or broken features. Yes, it’s inconvenient and prevents the game from being what it should be. But as gamers, we have agreed to accept some of these inconveniences in exchange for more complex and richer gameplay. No longer are we content with the simplicity of solitaire. We want online games, open worlds, and fast performance. We want games that look better and provide hours of entertainment. As a result, games have gotten bigger and more complex. This brings the increased probability there will be some problems.

This makes it difficult for the group of gamers who expect games to be perfect from day one. “Vote with your wallets” is their rallying cry. The truth is people have voted with their wallets, and they have voted that they find it acceptable if a game launches with a few bugs. Despite well known issues with a number of the big games from last year, people continued to purchase them. Punishing Ubisoft for bugs in Assassin’s Creed Unity by not buying Far Cry 4 is a pointless gesture that does nothing.

All this however does not give publishers and developers a pass on the product they release. It’s nice that problems can be fixed after launch, but it’s even nicer when a game doesn’t have to have a day one update. People are buying a product with certain expectations, and frequently those expectations have not been met. When a game is advertised as having certain key features, then those features must work. Players need to be able to experience the game that was promised, not one riddled with issues.

So while games today will occasionally launch with issues that need to be fixed, let’s not kid ourselves into thinking this is a new phenomenon. There was never a time when “games just worked” and nothing was ever broken.

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Brad is a video game enthusiast and family man. He's been gaming since the days of the Intellivision, and while that indicates he's been doing this for quite some time, he doesn't intend to quit anytime soon. Currently he's trying desperately to convince his daughter that there are more games than just Minecraft (unsuccessfully so far).
  • simon askew

    “. There was never a time when “games just worked” and nothing was ever broken.”

    This really is not a fair comment. The time you are commenting about is a time when games were still in their infancy. We are in 2015 now not the late 70s or 1980s.

    Lets not send the message to developers that just becuase games have always suffered from glitches and imperfections that its okay in this day and age.

    And lets be honest, games back then didnt come close to costing the amount of money that it takes to make a AAA title nowadays.

    the real problem though is technology. Companies know by now that they can cut costs by releasing a game early have ‘gamers’ be the guinea pigs, instead of thoroughly testing before release, and relying on patches to fix a game that should have been fixed before its release.

    Im 38 and grew up playing games. I started playing from the early 80s right up to present day. Sure, gaming was not perfect back then, maybe it will never be. But, gaming had an excuse: It was young.

    • Taero

      You could also argue that it had an advantage back then in being much MUCH simpler as well. Making pixels move across a screen in the atari days etc. required much less programming than fully rendered open world games with thousands of quest/npc conditional checks etc. I would argue that we move towards more bugs as we progress rather than less due to that complexity. As long as this isn’t due to laziness then at least we can patch them nowadays.

      • Sage

        no it’s easier to program these days with all the modern software. it’s just a larger scale, more people, man hours, and money are put into making games now and they last longer.

        • DarthDiggler

          @disqus_0x20zVKN0v:disqus

          no it’s easier to program these days with all the modern software. it’s
          just a larger scale, more people, man hours, and money are put into
          making games now and they last longer.

          LOL want to take a moment and think about what you just said based on the absurdity?

          The larger scale, the more people, the more man hours and yes the larger budgets are exactly what make it more complex.

          Many of your Atari 2600 games were done by 1 person. Sometimes you had another guy working sound, but generally the programmer was the artist as well. During the ShareWare hay days (Wolf3D, Doom, Descent) the teams were tiny and they were often the guys making copies of the floppies and sticking the labels on them. Distribution was very much a home based industry for those people.

          I bet you any developer around today would trade the 100+ person machine for the simplicity of yesteryear.

      • simon askew

        “As long as this isn’t due to laziness then at least we can patch them nowadays.”

        But that is one of the same is it not?

        • DarthDiggler

          @disqus_ArH2ZEKEMy:disqus & @simon_askew:disqus

          We are talking about people working nights and weekends to deliver us entertainment. What definition of Lazy are you applying here exactly?

          • simon askew

            So you are suggesting every developer works to the same standards? Just because one works nights and weekends does not mean laziness is not being practiced. Im talking about the effort thats being put into the game, not how many hours one has clocked up. There are people that can work twice the hours required in order to complete a job, its about efficiency. Day one patches are a joke and the very definition of lazy.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            This is a business that is very fast paced if you are not pulling your weight you don’t have the liberty to not perform. Too many other people depend on you.

            Day one patches happen because games have becoming increasingly complex and expensive to produce. Everyone has deadlines to work with very few games ship in a completely broken manner, even DriveClub had working offline as did Assassins Creed Unity. Battlefield 4’s issues mostly were in the larger Conquest matches (64-player). Most of the issues that we have these days are with online elements in games.

            You have developers that 2 years ago were developing mostly for 3 platforms X360, PS3, PC. Now that has expanded to 5 platforms.

            Some studios have more talent than others but I don’t think it’s fair to suggest any of these people are lazy. It’s a rather sophomoric position to take. What evidence do you have to support this claim?

          • simon askew

            We’re not in court. We are just a bunch of game loving people having a friendly discussion. No need to get so defensive about everything.

            I get it now: games of the past have been released broken and not. Same as games of today. And its probably going to remain that way.

            Next topic!

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            Look if you going to say something provocative back it up with evidence. It’s not a matter of being in court its a matter of applying critical thinking.

            Otherwise you are just passing falsehoods under the guise of “friendly discussion”.

            What you are doing is intellectually lazy. 🙂

          • simon askew

            I am fairly sure that my comments are understood as such. Do you think people are that stupid as to assume what I say is ‘truth’?

            Like you, and everyone else here, I am stating my opinion.

            But rest assured, if my next comment is citing a fact I will leave a bibliography just for your satisfaction.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            When you don’t preface your assumptions and speculations disclosing them as such are people supposed to read your mind?

            You are expressing a very uninformed opinion with the assumption that game developers are a lazy bunch and only care about getting your money with no regard to the qualify of games they release.

            That is an uninformed opinion that doesn’t jive with reality.

          • simon askew

            Go back and read my first comment. Then think about your reply. You are seriously over reacting to such a light comment. Think about it. Your replies have been attacking and personal. I have not attacked you once, personally or otherwise. I STATED MY OPINION, which you turned around and said I was stating facts, or trying to do so. It is you who is commenting here as if it is fact, not me.

            If you cant get past people expressing their opinions thats your problem not mine. Its my opinion and I dont need evidence or a bibliography to do so. You dont like it? Tough!

            And just for your peace of mind, I dont think all developers or publishers are lazy Some are some are not. And I have my reasons for how I get to that conclusion.
            You might think that is absurd. I think its absurd that you think ( because you cant know for a fact) all devs are really hard working and only care about pleasing everyone with their games.

            Funny thing is, you cant substantiate what you are trying to argue as fact. Its just your opinion. The difference is that I am only stating an opinion; I am not claiming to know anything.

          • Steve Jones

            In your opinion

          • Yoyitsu

            Not all day one patches “are a joke and the very definition of lazy” some, at least the smaller ones (I won’t condone 1+GB D1 patches), are released because the developers found a fault in the game when it was already too late to stop production of the product, telling the factory that will produce the disk or the online store that you’re pulling the game after pretty much sending the code is not good for business. From a capitalist POV making a day 1 patch is the better and more profitable option since you get to keep the trust from the production company.

    • DarthDiggler

      simon askew

      The reason the comment is fair is because everyone who complains about broken games these days tends to cite Nintendo as some sort of gold standard for releasing games without issue. This article makes that argument a moot point. Games have always had issues, there was no golden age of games that didn’t have issues.

      Lets not send the message to developers that just becuase games have
      always suffered from glitches and imperfections that its okay in this day and age.

      I think developers have their own concerns for quality control. It is in their best interest to have as few problems on launch day as possible — wouldn’t you agree?

      And lets be honest, games back then didnt come close to costing the amount of money that it takes to make a AAA title nowadays.

      This has absolutely little to do with the argument.

      the real problem though is technology. Companies know by now that they can cut costs by releasing a game early have ‘gamers’ be the guinea pigs, instead of thoroughly testing before release, and relying on patches to fix a game that should have been fixed before its release.

      This is a strawman argument because at this moment we really don’t have any evidence to suggest this is true. You are just assuming and speculating. That falls short of evidence. You would think we would have a great deal whistle blowers about this from people who have left studios. The fact is we don’t.

      Im 38 and grew up playing games. I started playing from the early 80s
      right up to present day. Sure, gaming was not perfect back then, maybe
      it will never be. But, gaming had an excuse: It was young.

      I am older than you started playing on Pong. The fact is if you are using current technology the technology is always young.

      The fact is this is a new generation so it will have it’s share of problems. Some will be in the game itself, the adoption rate of online features only adds further complexity because some of your issues may be in the datacenter and not on the consoles.

      The biggest change in the gaming industry is the gamer. When I was younger we were stoked to play games, broken, working, or otherwise. 🙂 With cartridges there was no ability to patch. Today gamers are far more entitled and this is for the worse IMHO. Also it seems often the most ignorant people want to talk the loudest and that doesn’t help.

      There is so much whining and crying from gamers now I am thinking they are becoming a target demographic for adult diapers. 🙂

      • simon askew

        “Games have always had issues, there was no golden age of games that didn’t have issues.” – I never said otherwise.

        “I think developers have their own concerns for quality control. It is in their best interest to have as few problems on launch day as possible — wouldn’t you agree?” – No, I wouldn’t. The priority for developers is making money/saving money, which is partly done by releasing games that have no right to be released because they have not been thoroughly tested.

        “This is a strawman argument because at this moment we really don’t have any evidence to suggest this is true. You are just assuming and speculating” – sure, it’s conjecture, thats how debates and questions are first approched is it not?

        “The fact is if you are using current technology the technology is always young.” – I was talking more about developers experience over the course of the 40 odd years electronic games have been made. Right now we can use experience and hindsight, back then, not so much.

        “Also it seems often the most ignorant people want to talk the loudest and that doesn’t help.” – what does that even mean?

        Relax buddy, I was just offering an opinion, I didn’t mean to strike a nerve.

        I would love to know what developer you work for.

        • DarthDiggler

          @simon_askew:disqus

          I never said otherwise.

          You took the author to task for saying the same thing…

          This really is not a fair comment. The time you are commenting about is a time when games were still in their infancy.

          No, I wouldn’t. The priority for developers is making money/saving money, which is partly done by releasing games that have no right to be released because they have not been thoroughly tested.

          So you think the best business model for AAA game developers is to try to screw their audience with low quality games that never get any testing?

          I am not saying that all studios and publishers operate in an angelic matter. I am suggesting that the motivation of profit is also the same motivation that propels quality. At the end of the day having a game be a rousing financial success is just as rewarding to the developers as it is to the financiers. People volunteering their hard earned dollars reinforces who has talent. This is how the free market economy works.

          sure, it’s conjecture, thats how debates and questions are first approched is it not?

          I prefer to debate things on the merit of their truth. Debating rumor and speculation is a complete waste of time. One shouldn’t just make assumptions and believe that is true. It would be far more useful to research if what you think is true is supported by evidence. Without evidence we are speaking about fiction.

          I was talking more about developers experience over the course of the 40 odd years electronic games have been made. Right now we can use experience and hindsight, back then, not so much.

          You can’t be serious here. Game development didn’t stagnate 40 years ago. The architecture of the old school Cartridge Consoles have little in common. The original PlayStation was a far different beast than the PS2 (which introduced a discreet GPU). Not every developer and studio survived the shift into new generations and some of that can be attributed to the complexity of the transition. Sure the PlayStation 4 now comes complete with an API with user manuals in English (more than you got with PS1 and PS2). All of those things help but none of it is a silver bullet that allows developers to create amazing games with ease.

          Relax buddy, I was just offering an opinion, I didn’t mean to strike a nerve.

          Well try informing yourself instead of spreading your presumption and assumption as Gospel. Just sick of over entitled gamers whining about stuff that is recreational and largely funded by disposable income. Its like developers owe them nothing short of a stellar experience or they are being lazy.

          I would love to know what developer you work for.

          None, but I have friends in the industry and I am sick of the constant vitriol aimed at people that just want to entertain you.

          • simon askew

            “that just want to entertain you.”

            how altruistic your friends are!

            How naive I am, when I thought games ( itgoes for virtually everything) were made to make money.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            I didn’t suggest they were angels. There is far more evidence to support them being hardworking than there is to support your assumptions that developers are just lazy and don’t feel like doing the work necessary to release a flawless product.

            How naive I am, when I thought games ( itgoes for virtually everything) were made to make money.

            Games are made to entertain people so they will buy them. People buying the enjoyable games raises revenues. Games that are not enjoyable generally don’t do well in this marketplace. There are new games released every week, more options for the consumer, more competition.

            You are very naive especially for 38 years old. Your assertation that people ONLY do things for money (and money alone) is very short sighted. You can enjoy what you do, make money and bring value to your customer all at the same time.

          • simon askew

            I didnt say ALL developers are lazy, just the ones that rush out games and rely on patches to fix problems that should not exist upon release.

            I suppose you think dlc, expansion packs and microtransactions are also made to entertain?

            unfortunately, most of the time, money is the reason things do, or do not take place.

            if the main purpose of game developing was to entertain people then why did activision basterdize destiny?

            One minute bungie are talking about a deep story and lots of exploration, the next minute we are sold a game that has a campaign so short it can be completed in a few short hours, and all thats left is basically a repetative hordewave mode.

            Sorry, I forgot, for a little extra we can buy the extra dlc, for our entertainment.

            People that buy games have the right to praise and criticise them. Its impossible, no matter what you do, to please everyone all the time.

            If we dont question some of the shady practices then nothing will change. Xboxone is a good example of that.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            I didnt say ALL developers are lazy, just the ones that rush out games and rely on patches to fix problems that should not exist upon release.

            Again this business is too fast paced for there to be huge weak links. Suggesting any developer is lazy is just flat out stupid. Not suggesting it never happens but if you had a lazy programmer that never meets his or her milestone deadlines they won’t be working for that studio long. There are too many people who depend on too many other people.

            I suppose you think dlc, expansion packs and microtransactions are also made to entertain?

            DLC, Expansions, Microtransactions are all just new ways for studios and publishers to generate revenues. I am a capitalist and I believe in free market enterprise. It is free markets and democratic societies that have delivered people the recreational time to play games and the disposable income to do so.

            If DLC, Expansions, Microtransactions offer value people will buy it. If DLC, Expansions, Microtransactions do not offer value people will not buy it. It is really that simple. Sure the system can be abused, but to date I don’t recall ever seeing a game that would sell you DLC that would allow you to use the X button. 🙂 Last I checked all DLC and Microtransactions have been optional.

            unfortunately, most of the time, money is the reason things do, or do not take place.

            I am really starting to question the integrity of your age. How a 38 year old can have these opinions and not live in their parents basement is beyond me. People who have to support themselves understand the trade that takes place every day between people with money and people with products / services that offer value. You simply can’t take people’s money legally — only Governments can do that with draconian tax codes.

            So while you are right, if there was no profit motivation games would not happen. At the same token game developers can’t just crap in a box and expect their product to sell. They need to offer compelling reasons for people to spend $60 on their title. Look at the sales figures for games and compare that to their review scores, you will likely see some patterns there.

            if the main purpose of game developing was to entertain people then why did activision basterdize destiny?

            I played Destiny quite a bit and I was never one of those people that thought Bungie screwed us out of content. What came on the disc was more content than you get with your average FPS game. If Destiny was a subscription based MMO people may have a point.

            I wasn’t impressed with Destiny’s first DLC pack. Did I cry, piss and moan on the internet about it? No! Will it affect weather or not I buy the next DLC — yes, I am a savvy consumer I can make my own decisions and my wallet is not on autopilot for any and all things gaming.

            Destiny is an excellent title which has a great deal of polish so I can appreciate that Bungie put so much time developing the game. The shooting mechanics are top notch, the narrative is a little weak which is mostly forgivable given the amount of polish the game has elsewhere.

            One minute bungie are talking about a deep story and lots of exploration, the next minute we are sold a game that has a campaign so short it can be completed in a few short hours, and all thats left is basically a repetative hordewave mode.

            So Destiny’s story was so bad it affected the gameplay? That’s not what I have read from the critics. There is exploration in the game, you have multiple planets you can go to with various things to do. It’s not on par with what No Man’s Sky looks to offer.

            Who completed the Destiny campaign in 2 hours?

            If you really think Destiny is some horde-mode you haven’t touched any of the raids. Strikes also give quite a challenge on the harder difficulties. How much have you actually played Destiny?

            Sorry, I forgot, for a little extra we can buy the extra dlc, for our entertainment.

            Yeah DLC is here to stay, it’s not going anywhere. You know why? Because PRIOR to DLC the Studio would release their game and than fire a bunch of people. You don’t need a team of 200 to spool up your next game, so you cut the fat and keep a very small team to start your concept stages.

            With DLC you have planned revenue generating activities. The Studio won’t have to fire nearly as many people if any at all. They can retain their talent and their team. Now studios are a more viable business.

            You know what, DLC is being worked on prior to a game being released. Low informed gamers like yourself assume that this means they are leaving something off the disc and screwing you. The fact is if you don’t have DLC ready a couple months after launch you are wasting your efforts. If studios waited until the game shipped to develop DLC that DLC would take at least 6-9 months to get out the door. By that time your game is already in the used channel or worse the bargain bin. If you don’t release DLC when the game has retail relevance you aren’t going to maximize the impact of that DLC on the audience.

            People that buy games have the right to praise and criticise them. Its impossible, no matter what you do, to please everyone all the time.

            I am not suggesting anything otherwise, I am just saying there are a large amount of people like yourself that base much of their critique in ignorance, presumption, assumption or speculation. I am suggesting that it is OK for gamers not to know something. They need not resort to their imagination to come up with the worst possible scenario and than trumpet that “opinion”.

            What I am sick to death of is the over entitled attitude that many gamers exhibit these days (you are a great example of this). I am sick of the chip on people’s shoulders like Sony and Microsoft owes them something.

            In the game industry many of these people have talents that would be very lucrative in other fields yet they make games because of their passion. So have a bit of respect, or at least a bit of gratitude. Game development isn’t some faucet you turn on or off and crap out the perfect game for you.

            If we dont question some of the shady practices then nothing will change. Xboxone is a good example of that.

            Well going by your “theories” here (I am using that word very liberally), if game companies were all evil greedy bastards why didn’t they just leave the DRM in there? 🙂

            The fact is MS changed showcases how important competition is. MS couldn’t keep their system like that in the face of what PlayStation 4 was offering. Granted gamers causing a stink made it hard to ignore, but at the end of the day the competition likely drove that decision just as much, if not more than gamers ire.

            I really have trouble believing your age, you seem to have never stepped foot into an economics class.

          • ruefrak

            Yes, yes, yes, yes! Darth gets it! My god! With a few (very well worded) comments, you have put to shame the majority of the “gaming press.” After reading through this comments thread, I’m really impressed with everything you’ve said.
            I agree. Well said. Keep it coming! Only by calling out the ignorant can we put an end to this echo chamber of stupidity.

          • DarthDiggler

            @ruefrak:disqus

            I don’t understand why developers and studios at the very least can’t have some assumed respect, given the amount of time they sacrifice for this craft. I can definitely understand publisher ire, the publishers are the guys that make the money decisions that make the game work economically (without which you do not have a game). I don’t understand the level of ire at any entities when they make it their mission to entertain us. I don’t understand the lack of basic economics training that people think that profit is a dirty word.

            I am sick of this chip on gamers shoulders like developers owe them something. I am sick of gamers not understanding common software licensing laws. I am sick of gamers jumping to the conclusion that someone is out to get them because they expect you to pay for something.

            If $60 means that much to you — stop playing games and recess your priorities in life. Save the drama for your momma and get a real job.

          • ruefrak

            The answer is that it’s just easier to say “the developers are lazy” than it is to actually think things through. The basic principles of business are lost on a lot of people and the idea that a studio might want to have a steady revenue stream goes over a lot of people’s heads. They’re always assuming that they’re being cheated or scammed somehow.

            They’ve gotten so used to getting such amazing value for their money that they don’t realize how good they have it. $60 for a game? Rarely do I pay that. $50 gives me 72 “free” games every year. Weekly sales fill my game library to the brink where it’s going to bust. A few dollars spent here and there and suddenly the number of games I have to play is astounding. That’s why we’re constantly complaining of our “back log.” We have too many games and not enough time to play them.

            Contrast this to the days of the NES where you had one game added every few months. Aside from Mario, we had Rush ‘n Attack and Contra to keep us happy. Eventually we got Zelda and Metroid to spice things up, but our library never grew much beyond that. Why? Because back then games actually were really expensive. $60 in 1987 money was a lot.

            I can also tell you that if my library back then was the size of mine today, I never would have finished The Legend of Zelda. There’s no way I would waste my time setting random bushes on fire in the hopes that one of them might reveal a passage.

          • DarthDiggler

            @ruefrak:disqus

            There seems to be this common misconception that gamers are some kind of hapless victims of publishers marketing. Last I checked the average age of a gamer was somewhere in the 28-32 range. I think people that are on average 28-32 are savvy consumers and they can make up their minds about which games have the most value to them.

            You point out plainly that gamers aren’t stupid with their money. If you have a little patience you can get relatively new games on the cheap. If you have a great deal of patience you can wait a year and get the “Full” edition of the game with all the DLC usually for less then the original $60 price tag.

            This is how expensive gaming used to be. When you account for inflation the cost of gaming has come down, while the technology has gone exponentially UP.

            Baffle Ball
            $18 (1931 dollars) $280 (2014 dollars)

            Baffle Ball Per Play Cost
            $0.01 (1931 dollars) $0.16 (2014 dollars)

            Pong Home Unit
            $99 (1972 dollars) $560.69 (2014 dollars)

            Atari 2600
            $199 (1977 dollars) $777 (2014 dollars)

            Atari 2600 Games ($20-$30)
            $20 Game (1977 dollars) $78 (2014 dollars)
            $30 Game (1977 dollars) $117 (2014 dollars)

            NES
            $299 (1985 dollars) $658 (2014 dollars)

            NES Games ($40-$50)
            $40 Game (1985 dollars) $88 (2014 dollars)
            $50 Game (1985 dollars) $110 (2014 dollars)

            Even before the NES days, the quarter munchers were a far more expensive way to game if you were going to give it any real amount of time. The arcade owner could increase the difficulty at his will to increase revenues. Could you imagine the ire today if a publisher adjusted the difficulty of a game post release because they felt people were finishing it too quickly?

            I think the problem is the game “news” authors are just much younger than the audience. They don’t have the experience to understand what integrity means. They have lots of passion which gets mistaken for expertise.

          • simon askew

            “What came on the disc was more content than you get with your average FPS game.”

            Thank you, you have just answered all of my questions.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            I stand behind the statement, it’s 100% fact. Most FPS games you are lucky to get a 6-10 hour campaign. Destiny clocks in around 10-15 hours, I am sure people can speed run it much quicker now, but when the game was new most people I know were taking 10+ hours. You got a selection of Multiplayer maps not too much unlike what COD or Halo would ship with. Not to mention the sheer vast amount of weapons available.

            All that for $60.

          • simon askew

            Great, you like destiny and think you got plenty of content for your money.

            I dont like it, and think it lacks content: decent story, campaign etc.

            the game is basically a bunch of hordewave modes, and thats not why I bought the game.

            we dont agree.

            who’s right?

            Thats right, no one is right or wrong, we are just expressing our opinions.

            Stop trying to convince me that you are right and I am wrong.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            You are a very poor debater. Twisting my words doesn’t make what you say true.

            I do like Destiny, but lost interest with the DLC, I thought the DLC was minimal content. I was trying to put things in perspective for you but perhaps analogies and comparisons are above your intellect.

            If you own any other FPS game that offers a 6-10 hour campaign and has some multiplayer maps — and you were satisfied with that for $60, it would be hard to argue that Destiny “short changed” you on content. That is if you are consistent and don’t want to be considered a hypocrite.

            I am only trying to correct you where you are wrong and you make claims without any evidence to back it up. At least you aren’t still telling me developers are lazy so you are learning. 🙂 There is still hope yet for you sonny! 🙂

          • simon askew

            “If you own any other FPS game that offers a 6-10 hour campaign and has some multiplayer maps — and you were satisfied with that for $60, it would be hard to argue that Destiny “short changed” you on content. That is if you are consistent and don’t want to be considered a hypocrite.”

            What?

            How can you justify your presumption that I have been satisfied with 6-10 hour campains, and then call me a hypocrite?

            Okay, prove that my opinions are wrong. I want to see evidence please!

            Ie., prove that my opinion some games are being rushed out not being as polished as they could be thus relying on patches to finish the job.

            Funny thing is, you are trying to prove you are right and I am not. Thats not what im doing, thats why I dont need to prove anything to you. Since when does anyone need to prove their opinion?

            Once I have reviewed the evidence and it has convinced me that my opinions are wrong I will apologise and never again give an opinion online regarding games and the gaming industry.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            If you can’t understand English we can’t have a discussion. I never said you were a hypocrite. There was an IF attached to that statement that you blatantly ignored to make your stupid, sophomoric point.

            If you can’t be bothered with properly understanding what I said, than I can’t be bothered responding to someone who is willfully ignorant.

            Have a good day dumbass.

          • Steve Jones

            Lol touchy.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            LOL Dumbass – have fun flipping burgers for a living.

          • Steve Jones

            Aww thanks. I will.

          • simon askew

            Ah……….there we are, true colours finally shown. Will the reall darthdiggler please stand up!

            Didnt take long for you to start talking like a degenerate. Shame really, you were doing so well.

          • Steve Jones

            Do you think if we ignore him he’ll go away?

          • simon askew

            “Have a good day dumbass.”

            Now you have hurt my feelings.

            And while your at go and learn what an opinion is. Then you will discover how pointless your replies have been.

          • Steve Jones

            Now we made him spit out his dummy. Man who thought opinions were so wrong. Still I guess when you know everything it must hurt to have people disagree.

          • simon askew

            Im impressed though. Darthdiggler knew so much. I bet he is a professor at Harvard or yale. I feel smarter after our discussion thats for sure. Wow so many facts he spoke of. How can one possibly refute all those facts and all that proof. Just a shame he doesnt know the meaning of opinion……poor lad.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Is that really the best you two can do intellectually? You both have constantly twisted my words and not once did you offer anything as evidence to support your claims or opinions. NOT ONCE. Just your opinion based on assumption. No need of any input from outside your narrow little minds.

            You don’t need an advanced degree to be intellectually curious.

          • Steve Jones

            Awww he replied again

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Yeah the smartest person in the room here is really no contest. 🙂

          • Steve Jones

            Ha ha ha your definition of smart is open for debate.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Not with you and dumbass #2 in the room. 🙂

          • Steve Jones

            Indeed. Smart by default. In your own opinion . How sad.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus & @simon_askew:disqus

          • Steve Jones

            Wow Mr Cleese I couldn’t have said it better myself. Hopefully Mr Diggler reads this and applies it to himself.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            We can disagree just fine. Just don’t guise your claims as opinions and get mad when the facts don’t match what you said. Factually incorrect is factually incorrect no matter how you want to wrap it up.

          • Steve Jones

            Firstly; I am not masking my opinions. That is you dear. Secondly; I am not getting mad that is also you.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus @simon_askew:disqus

            Steve, you have brought no evidence or intelligence into this conversation at all. Neither has Simon. Grown ups deal in facts when discussing things, otherwise it’s fiction.

            Good luck at the Fry Station guys! I am sure you will have great career advancement at your local Burger King!

          • Steve Jones

            Sigh simple things go over your head. Still with an ego like yours that isn’t surprising. I love how you think of yourself as intelligent though. That’s sweet.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            You know cherry picking is a weak form of debate and one of the logical fallacy sins.

            https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/the-texas-sharpshooter

            I took the time to respond to every one of your arguments. You two were intellectually lazy. Either you two are very young or very stupid. I hope it’s the former for your both of your sake. It doesn’t take an ego to articulate how stupid you two are. You have offered up nothing but vapid arguments that cherry pick my words and argue semantics. Which are common tactics by people who don’t really know what they are talking about. Then for an encore you got personal with me (I gave it right back).

            The lack of any credentials cited from both of you is noted.

          • Steve Jones

            I love how you keep noting things as though it makes a difference. Your opinion is inconsequential to me. You have your opinion and I have mine. That’s as far as anything in this life goes.

          • Steve Jones

            Also you have cherry picked. The comments you can’t answer to are the ones you have ignored. Like putting words in our mouths. Why haven’t you addressed that? You put two quotes in my mouth that I never said. You have no idea about my opinion on games and the industry. You are making ill informed assumptions. Also grown ups don’t speak down to people because they are deluded into thinking they are intellectually superior and actually think it means something. But I guess this is what happens when you try to converse with an insecure 12 year old who thinks using a dictionary makes him sound clever 🙂

          • simon askew

            What a sneaky writhing snake you are. And a lier. Did I mention that? It is you that are twisting peoples opinions to suit you then saying thats what we are doing. Sneaky. Shady. Nasty. Disgusting.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            Seriously you are beyond hope. You are dumb as a bag of hammers.

            Kindly go choke on your man hood and have a great life with your minimum wage jobs.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            I know what opinion is. Unfortunately you think you can exchange opinions for facts and that isn’t the case. When you start saying things that are not true and you have no evidence to back it up, that isn’t opinion — that is just being intellectually dishonest.

            For example…

            I could say “It’s my opinion you are a transsexual.”

            Is it an opinion? Yes. is it true? I don’t know — don’t care. I will keep repeating it all the time — because it’s my opinion!

          • Steve Jones

            Woah you are one twisted sister. You keep making up things and putting words in our mouths. But thank you for proving you can’t identify an opinion sunshine.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Do you not understand the terminology…

            “For Example”

            Do you not understand satire?

            Did you leave school in the 3rd grade or are you naturally dim witted?

          • Steve Jones

            I think it comes naturally 🙂

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Obviously, your parents must be so proud.

          • Steve Jones

            They’re dead.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Well at least they won’t have to witness their boy wasting away on the internet with his minimum wage intellect.

          • Steve Jones

            No but your parents have to put up with a deluded mentally retarded son who has to try and add meaning into his life by convincing everyone that his opinion is fact.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus @simon_askew:disqus

            I have cited evidence. You have cited NONE.

            Can we all agree on that simple point? 🙂

            I know people in the game industry — it’s not some black and white world of good and evil that you two make it out to be. Money is a big factor, but developers know that you can’t develop real revenues with shitty products. Does that mean ALL games are awesome? That none are just a cash in? NO it does not. Competition gives gamers new options every week and the bad games won’t sell as well as the good ones. On occasion great games get ignored, on occasion crappy games sell well. Predicting market forces is by no means a science.

            I have done programming, I have done graphic design, I have launched websites. I helped bring a website from 25K hits a month to well over a 1 million hits a month. I was a writer, I was an editor, I helped manage forums, I helped with developer relations. I reviewed many titles (I’d have to count them to get an honest figure). Sony pulled quotes from some of my reviews to advertise their games.

            So pardon me if I have some expertise and I can articulate my thoughts.

            The internet is full of information if you aren’t too LAZY (to borrow Simon’s words) to look for it. Inform yourself so you don’t have to rely on vapid arguments and then argue the semantics of the word opinion because your opinions don’t jive with the facts.

            If you say something that isn’t factually correct it doesn’t matter if its in the form of an opinion or a 2500-word thesis. It’s still factually incorrect.

          • Steve Jones

            It’s an opinion. Like yours. Neither of us are right or wrong. Now calm down and accept that simple truth.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Says the guy that offers nothing to the conversation.

            You can have an opinion.

            IE: I feel the game industry is ripping me off.

            That is all 100% fine and good. When you say shit like “the game industry doesn’t care about quality” or “games are priced too damned high, developers are ripping me off”.

            All of those things can be fact checked. When the facts do not side with your claims your claims are WRONG.

            Joe: “I feel like the sky is Green”

            Jon: “You may feel like that but you must have ate something funny for lunch, the sky is Blue.”

            Joe: “No the sky is Green, I just know it, don’t show me pictures of blue skies that is meaningless.

            Jon: “Whatever you say dumbass!”

            See how it works?

            This isn’t up for debate. 🙂 If you say things that are not factually correct you can’t just say it’s your opinion. I mean you can but you justifiably look like a total asshole.

            Have a good night dumbasses.

          • Steve Jones

            Hang on when did I make those two claims? I haven’t ha ha. Awwww you have to make things up to feel like you have won. Well done. You win. Congratulations. You can masterbate over your victory now 🙂

          • simon askew

            Wow! Thats a pretty impressive Resume.

            A cock measuring contest huh?

            well, I know what the definition of opinion is.

            But why would you share your elite credentials to a couple of burger flippers?

          • Steve Jones

            Ha ha ha oh mate you are so silly. I have no gaming credentials but I can still have an opinion. What a mindless elitist you are. We never said it was black and white. Again putting words in our mouths. Making assumptions with no evidence to support your claims of what we are trying to say. I hope you note this comment. I like it when you do that.

          • simon askew

            You dont know what an opinion is. Thats just about the only thing you have proved here.

            you are a pathalogical lier.

            Stop twisting my opinions then telling lies to make out im twisting what you are saying.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            For one thing Simon you didn’t even bring up the word opinion until quite a few messages in.

            You can’t hold up your “opinion” with factual inaccuracies and still suggest that it is a valid item for the topic of conversation.

            At that point you should be willing to admit maybe somethings about your opinion are wrong. If you feel so strongly about your opinion why don’t you validate it with facts.

          • simon askew

            And if you dont realise by now, at your age, that a comment in a forum or a web site is most probably someones opinion I pity you.

            but its my opinion ( just so you dont think this is a fact and twist it) that you knew very well the comments I made were my opinions, you just manipulated and twisted my opinions and tried to make out I was speaking facts.

            Oh, thats right if you approached my first comment as a normal human being, we would not be where we are at now. But becuase you have manipulated a simple comment/opinion that I made, and made out that Ithink I know facts about the industry, you completed you mission to drag me into your world. Congrats.

            Who are you? I do not need to prove or validate anything to you. Get over it.

            and I dont feel that strongly, I made an opinion. And until you learn what an opinion is , and learn to accept peoples opinions, I have nothing more to say to you. OPINION

          • Steve Jones

            Because he doesn’t have to. It’s his choice to state his opinion. You are nobody to say whether or not he can or can’t do this. You are an inconsequential human who thinks he is something special and some kind of authority. In your opinion he is wrong…this does not make you right.

          • Steve Jones

            Can you please provide the evidence where he said his opinions were facts? I can’t for the life of me find where he said that anywhere.

          • Steve Jones

            Some developers are lazy. Fact 🙂 also who are you to correct people when you consider them wrong?? Wow you think you are something special.

          • vongruetz .

            Super Mario Bros. is over in about 20 minutes (assuming you take your time).

          • Steve Jones

            A linear hoard wave FPS that offers nothing new for $60. How blessed we should feel.

          • Steve Jones

            Lol if Sony and Microsoft want our money they do owe us something. Surely even you can grasp that right?

          • Steve Jones

            He wasn’t spreading his presumption and assumption as Gospel. That is just in your opinion. Stop preaching. No one care what you have to say 🙂

  • simon askew

    Why are you going so far back into gaming history to defend games of today? Thats just cheap!

    If games from 10 years ago could be released without any significant problems to speak of, there is no excuse now.

    I never had any issues playing XIII, bg&e, silent hill, halo, soulcalibur, burnout etc…. (so older than 10 years)

    yet games like driveclub, masterchief collection,colonial marines, for example, have had many issues.

    I love games and I dont want the current trend of day one patches to continue. Lets debate how to change this trend rather than to excuse it.

    • vongruetz .

      I love games too, and I’m not defending games of today, nor am I attacking games from the past. I’m just pointing out that the mantra of “games just worked” back then is a falsehood.
      I played games 30 years ago that were broken and I played games in 2014 that were broken. But for every broken game, there are dozens more that launch with no problems.

      • DarthDiggler

        @vongruetz:disqus

        Good luck patching a cartridge. The modern gamer fails to appreciate that at least the developer has a chance to actually correct the issues.

    • DarthDiggler

      @simon_askew:disqus

      I never had any issues playing XIII, bg&e, silent hill, halo, soulcalibur, burnout etc…. (so older than 10 years)

      How many of those games had ONLINE elements? 🙂

      Can you see the pattern here? The fact is online stuff often can’t be completely tested until launch day because it is very hard to simulate millions slamming your servers. Until there is a practical solution for that, we will have to weather some issues.

      I can do it in an adult manner and not cry, piss and moan about it.

      • vongruetz .

        It does seem that 95% of all problems get fixed once you take the system offline. Over Christmas, a bunch of people had problems even starting Disney Infinity because of the mess with PSN, but once you turned networking off, everything worked just fine.

      • simon askew

        “can do it in an adult manner and not cry, piss and moan about it”

        Lol. Right, you just cry, piss and moan to comments you dont like.

        you carry on supporting shady ethics pal, thats your choice. Like its your choice to be happy with content ingames getting shorter and moving more towards dlc.

        I, on the other will not. And im sure im not the only one.

        glad destiny makes you happy, hope the infinate amount of expansion packs and dlcs continue to please you.

        • DarthDiggler

          @simon_askew:disqus

          you carry on supporting shady ethics pal, thats your choice.

          So now you are making assumptions while at the same time insulting me. 🙂

          A business model that creates a revenue stream isn’t shady ethics as long as all the costs are disclosed.

          Want to try again Simon?

          • simon askew

            You feel insulted by that???? Okay………

            Fine, you keep making excuses.

            but I wont exacerbate the problem.

          • DarthDiggler

            @simon_askew:disqus

            Dude you are a non-stop walking talking logical fallacy. I make no excuses I explain and attempt to communicate, you keep repeating the same cliched crap and expect it to become true magically. You keep citing strawmen and using sharpshooter tactics to cherry pick what you reply to.

            If a business model discloses all the costs there is nothing unethical about that business model. All DLC cost is disclosed before games release generally.

            It’s the very reason they hand you a menu when you get to a restaurant.

            🙂

          • Steve Jones

            I guess you don’t know what an opinion is. Also wow you really are naive mate. Business is not fair. End of.

  • Nonscpo

    A Missingno. you take me back the classical days of handheld gaming were I had to beg my parent’s to buy me a GameBoy, unlike today were kids tell their parents to buy them an Ipad and the parents actually do it. Seriously somewhere down the line something went terribly wrong with parenthood, but alas that is an argument for another day.

    P.S. Missingno. one of the best glitches ever, ‘nough said 😉

  • aros

    Ridiculous article that shows the authors limited knowledge and lack of research. Painful to read. The first article I’ve read on TVL that I’ve felt like this about. Sorry guys but this was Really poor.

    • DarthDiggler

      @disqus_6FFPLGyRZl:disqus

      Ridiculous article that shows the authors limited knowledge and lack of research.

      Did you read the article? The guy cited games from history that shipped with issues. In terms of gaming articles this one did far more research than most of the assumption based garbage I read on a daily basis.

      The lack of citing any evidence to the contrary is noted though. 🙂 Maybe when you done stuffing that strawman you can feed your horse with what’s left over.

      • Steve Jones

        Now aren’t you an interesting one. You want more evidence than a jury yet are unwilling to provide evidence yourself. At the end of the day some developers (Capcom, EA and alas Ubisoft) are becoming increasingly more shady. They are starting to care less about the quality and about money. You want evidence? Play Battlefield 4 and Watchdogs 🙂 as for Capcom play any of their Super/Awesome/Stupendous street fighter titles. Do you think EA release yearly sports titles for entertainment? If so you should be a comedian.

        • DarthDiggler

          @Steve Jones

          You want more evidence than a jury yet are unwilling to provide evidence yourself.

          I want evidence to these wild claims, of which no one on this forum has presented 1 form of actual evidence. Everything has been assumption (developers are lazy), presumption (developers are greedy), speculation (optional DLC/MicroTrans is theft).

          Not one basis in fact.

          At the end of the day some developers (Capcom, EA and alas Ubisoft) are becoming increasingly more shady. They are starting to care less about the quality and about money.

          Again yet another claim with NO EVIDENCE. Also your claim isn’t original or new, so you are becoming a cliche (aka myth).

          You want evidence? Play Battlefield 4 and Watchdogs 🙂

          So you cite 2 games as evidence that the entire gaming industry is conspiring to generate more DLC and less on disc content, all the while releasing games intentionally in a broken format?

          This may blow your mind because you are very uninformed, but that isn’t evidence at all.

          BF4 had a rocky launch but the game wasn’t 100% unplayable. Most of the issues were the bigger maps that housed up to 64-players and featured levelution. There was an issue with server syncing which proved to a stubborn. As EA/DICE patched the game they made improvements but often when they released DLC they would have more problems. The major issues with that game was server issues. I you played BF4 today or anytime in the past 9 months or so, it is a completely different story.

          Watchdogs again was another game that suffered mostly from online issues, the offline issues were rectified quickly the biggest beef from players was the way the cars handled.

          Games that feature online elements will always have more launch day woes than games that do not. When you introduce an online element you make your game much more complex. Depending on how you execute the online elements you may need to reinvest in your network infrastructure.

          The fact is you can’t beta test and simulate launch day with millions of people slamming your resources. At the moment there aren’t many solutions for this problem.

          Capcom play any of their Super/Awesome/Stupendous street fighter titles.

          I haven’t played SF in a while, but if people are buying the game and enjoying it — who are you to tell them Capcom has ripped them off? If you felt the cost of entry was too high and didn’t play — good for you.

          Do you think EA release yearly sports titles for entertainment? If so you should be a comedian.

          Do you think EA gets the rights to release those sports games with a full roster of real people for free? Do you even know how much money they spend on licensing at EA? Not just for sports, but weapons and cars too. If there is anything in a game that is a version of something in real life the publisher had to pay rights to feature that item or persons image.

          Here are some stats for you to chew on in terms of what interactive entertainment has actually cost people over the years. Overall quality of games has never been higher and the overall cost is much cheaper than we historically paid when you account for inflation.

          Baffle Ball
          $18 (1931 dollars) $280 (2014 dollars)

          Baffle Ball Per Play Cost
          $0.01 (1931 dollars) $0.16 (2014 dollars)

          Pong Home Unit
          $99 (1972 dollars) $560.69 (2014 dollars)

          Atari 2600
          $199 (1977 dollars) $777 (2014 dollars)

          Atari 2600 Games ($20-$30)
          $20 Game (1977 dollars) $78 (2014 dollars)
          $30 Game (1977 dollars) $117 (2014 dollars)

          NES
          $299 (1985 dollars) $658 (2014 dollars)

          NES Games ($40-$50)
          $40 Game (1985 dollars) $88 (2014 dollars)
          $50 Game (1985 dollars) $110 (2014 dollars)

          Games (overall) which are made by people have always shipped with issues. People aren’t flawless and the old systems were not flawless. The issues were less I will grant you that, but the level of complexity was far less than anything we play today.

          • Steve Jones

            Oh dear. No you are correct. ALL developers are angels. They ONLY have OUR best intentions at heart and in no way do anything that we wouldn’t like. You continue to live in that fantasy world if it pleases you. However I will continue to to enjoy my non-biased opinion of the industry and hope it starts to improve.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Oh dear. No you are correct. ALL developers are angels. They ONLY have OUR best intentions at heart and in no way do anything that we wouldn’t like.

            I never said they were all angels and I can quote myself from yesterday…

            I am not saying that all studios and publishers operate in an angelic matter. I am suggesting that the motivation of profit is also the same motivation that propels quality. At the end of the day having a game be a rousing financial success is just as rewarding to the developers as it is to the financiers. People volunteering their hard earned dollars reinforces who has talent. This is how the free market economy works.

            Twisting my words may make you feel better, but doesn’t elevate your argument. We have a marketplace to keep developers and publishers honest. Does it mean they are as pure as the driven snow? Not necessarily, but unless I have specific evidence that showcases wrongdoing I see no need to assume the wrongdoing is there, that would be intellectually dishonest.

            If and when a developer / publisher gets too greedy with their pricing — people won’t buy. We don’t need to go to the internet to have some 13 year old tell us this on a website they setup 2 months ago. We gamers can make these decisions ourselves and in real-time! 🙂

            You continue to live in that fantasy world if it pleases you. However I will continue to to enjoy my non-biased opinion of the industry and hope it starts to improve.

            Please note when I responded to your comment I provided you with facts and figures to support my argument (gaming is just as cost effective or cheaper today than it ever was). You like many others provide nothing but presumption, assumption and speculation. All fall short of the truth sans evidence.

            The lack of any evidence cited from you is noted. Got any more “game companies are the boogie man” stories for me?

          • Steve Jones

            Yawn. Sorry I fell asleep through some of that. You sure do enjoy twisting what people say. Plus I missed your evidence of game companies being as angelic as you are making out. You are an entertaining fellow.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            How can I twist what people say when I quote it verbatim in an effort to be accurate?

          • Steve Jones

            Well we know that’s a lie. You made up quotes from me twice. Try again 🙂

        • simon askew

          Just quit. He does not listen to anything anyone says. Let him believe what he thinks is ‘truth’ . Let him/ or her, think we are not allowed to state an opinion. Thats it, I quit now.

          • Steve Jones

            Hell no. This guy is too much fun.

      • Steve Jones

        Huh? The guy cited games from the past to support his claims and so did I. Him doing it is fine but I can’t? Yeah good one amigo.

  • simon askew

    Just been playing on the hd remake of resident evil. Great game! What surprises me is how few updates capcom have given it upon its re release. I guess they pretty much nailed it on the gamecube version. Now, you would think after 10 years capcom would have heavily patched it, but no, its pretty much identical to the gamecube version. Why is that? Im guessing its because capcom knew they had to get it right upon release, knowing at that time, that after release it wouldn’t be possbble possible to amend it. I saw nothing heavily patched in any of the re releases: bg&e, windwaker, silent hill. Sure, there were a few light touches they made, but that was probably more to do with persuading some people it was worth re purchasing should they already own it.

    if a game like resident evil can be re released and have fewer amendments than a current game has in the space of its first week of release, what does that tell you?

    If we stop questioning heavily patched games we are telling developers/ publishers that its okay to rush out unfinished games.

    No! No! No!

    Games could be completed just fine a decade ago, so there is no excuse now.

    • DarthDiggler

      @simon_askew:disqus

      Yeah they did nothing to the PS4 version. LOL

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITGNvv6r7G8

      Yes the GameCube version did have bugs and glitches.

      http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%22resident+evil%22+bugs+gamecube

      • Steve Jones

        Woah. What HUGE changes. It’s like a completely new game. Blew my mind.

        • DarthDiggler

          @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

          New textures, way better anti-aliasing (no more jaggies), looks like they may have actual lighting now too and not just “prebaked” lighting. Not 100% sure but it appears the next gen version has reflections too. They widened the color palette as well.

          Was the original rendered 4:3 or 16:9? If 4:3 they had to do a bunch of tuning for 16:9.

          What HUGE changes. It’s like a completely new game

          It’s a remake not a brand new game. How dense are you?

          • Steve Jones

            Ha ha ha ha all those changes are meaningless. If they just released the Cube version it would have been just as fine. Now if it was as big a difference as the PS1 to the Cube then you would have a point.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Ha ha ha ha all those changes are meaningless. If they just released the Cube version it would have been just as fine. Now if it was as big a difference as the PS1 to the Cube then you would have a point.

            You aren’t going to get a huge difference as you did from the PS1 -> GameCube version for one thing they already made a great deal of optimizations from the PS1 version (which were many in number — the PS1 didn’t have a discreet GPU).

            The new textures isn’t a great deal of heavy lifting, but adding the anti-aliasing would have been a change of the code. Any time you change code you have a chance of breaking it. The reflections were a very nice touch which would have require code changes. If the lighting is real time, that would have required code changes.

            If the GameCube version rendered in 4:3 they would have had to change the code for 16:9 unless you like everything looking fat on your screen. Changing to 16:9 they would have had to re-tune elements of the game to make sure the additional screen space didn’t give away any of the scares.

            How do you think games are made? A Capcom dev just walks into a datacenter and starts barking out orders at his voice activated computers and it all just magically happens?

            Granted making this game wasn’t a huge endeavor, but you make it sound like they just loaded the code on the PS4 developer unit and hit the compile button.

            It is my speculation given your cavalier attitude you don’t understand programming or game development at all.

          • Steve Jones

            No again man you are correct. I have no knowledge and am ill informed because hey you say so. And if you say so it must be true. Wow you amaze man. I am in awe of you. You must be the only person on the planet who is convinced that their opinion is fact. How cute 🙂

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            No again man you are correct. I have no knowledge and am ill informed because hey you say so. And if you say so it must be true. Wow you amaze man. I am in awe of you. You must be the only person on the planet who is convinced that their opinion is fact. How cute 🙂

            Steve perhaps you have issues with reading English too. I said…

            “It is my speculation given your cavalier attitude you don’t understand programming or game development at all.”

            I clearly stated this was speculation that I wasn’t submitting that information as fact.

            How much programming do you have under your belt?

          • Steve Jones

            None. Making my opinion meaningless. I have never made a film either. Or wrote a song…so I guess I can’t comment on those industries either. You know like the majority of people. That is such a moot point.

          • simon askew

            “It’s a remake not a brand new game. How dense are you”

            if im not mistaken the gamecube version of resi is also a remake of the original ps1 game. Quite a big difference there.

            but your bad the latest version of resi is a remaster not a remake.

            last comment seeing as you obviously havnt played both games: gamecube version was 4:3. If you play the game 16:9 you lose some picture. So not that much tuning.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            if im not mistaken the gamecube version of resi is also a remake of the original ps1 game. Quite a big difference there.

            I addressed that below to Steve…..

            You aren’t going to get a huge difference as you did from the PS1
            -> GameCube version for one thing they already made a great deal of
            optimizations from the PS1 version (which were many in number — the PS1 didn’t have a discreet GPU).

            The new textures isn’t a great deal of heavy lifting, but adding the anti-aliasing would have been a change of the code. Any time you change code you have a chance of breaking it.

            The reflections were a very nice touch which would have require code
            changes. If the lighting is real time, that would have required code
            changes.

            but your bad the latest version of resi is a remaster not a remake.

            Remastering games is a misnomer. When you remaster movies or audio you go back to original tapes and you have to do quite a bit to get them up to snuff. Remastering historically has always been with analog source materials. Digital materials don’t need remastering. They just call it remastered because it sounds cooler than remake. It is a remake as GameCube code would never run on the PS4 without an emulator. Not trying to pick on you just pointing out that the nomenclature is more marketing driven than technology.

            last comment seeing as you obviously havnt played both games: gamecube version was 4:3. If you play the game 16:9 you lose some picture. So not that much tuning.

            Look I am not trying to be a jerk here but with all due respect you are wrong. I don’t need to play both games to know that if the old game was 4:3 they need to do some work to get it to be 16:9. 16:9 is a wider aspect ratio than 4:3. Capcom won’t simply truncate the top and bottom to get the image to fit in a 16:9 screen. If anything they may have done a small amount of truncating and a good deal of making the visible view wider without spoiling the scares.

          • Steve Jones

            You must love the taste of your own cock. At the end of the day the Cube and PS4 versions of Resi and almost identical with some minor changes. That is a fact. Playing them proves that 🙂

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Look I hadn’t called you any names I just pointed out how intellectually weak your arguments were. I can take the gloves off too son.

            I am quite frankly sick of talking to willfully ignorant mental midgets. You both have a tainted perception of the game industry and I would imagine the world at large. It is all based on ignorance. You have exchanged facts for gut feelings and don’t seem to think anything is wrong with that. The words “critical thinking” haven’t entered your 16 word vocabulary.

            Neither of you know anything of substance about the game industry. Neither of you seem to have any economics schooling at all. Which is why you think everyone in business is out to screw you. You don’t even understand the basic premise of currency, so it is no surprise more advanced things like competition completely escape your feeble uninformed minds.

            If you can’t hang with the big dogs stay on the porch.

          • Steve Jones

            Ooooo nice analogy. That put me to shame. Sorry big errrr dog. I beg for forgiveness. You really are so mentally retarded. I feel quite sorry for you boyo.

          • DarthDiggler

            @disqus_NbvXty4NmI:disqus

            Says the guy that hasn’t said 1 intelligent thing since he has joined the conversation. 🙂 LOL

          • Steve Jones

            In your opinion 🙂

      • simon askew

        Where did I write they did nothing to ps4 version?

        Gamecube version: 2002

        Ps4 version: 2015

        Thats a big gap. A bigger gap than the improved visuals would suggest.

        Not really as impressive as the leap from ps1 version to gamecube, but its okay.

        Gamecube version still looks fantastic.

        Have to admit buddy, you got me there. Real day and night difference.

  • Steve Jones

    Now remember everyone…you are not allowed to state an opinion. That is wrong. Do not think for yourself and if you disagree with something you had better keep it to yourself. Forums would be a different place if this comes to pass.

  • ultraviolet

    every console game has to go through a quality submission process, how did Assassin’s Creed Unity get past this process without a few clandestine meetings in underground carparks involving shadowy figures with briefcases of cash 🙂

  • Lester Paredes

    Yes. I do remember a time where games just worked. There was a time when there was no need to update the system, and then download a day one patch, and then be unable to play because the servers are overloaded or the networks being attacked… I just put in my game and played. Good old SNES. The NES was a bit more finicky, and you had to eject the cartridge and blow in it (that did nothing, honestly, but it felt like it did), and try again. It took 40 minutes for me to be able to start playing Hyrule Warriors on Christmas. And I couldn’t even set up my PS TV with my account information due to the DDoS attack. I never had such issues with my Gamecube.
    Unfinished games are not an entirely new wrinkle, as they’ve always been around, but seem to be becoming the norm with big blockbuster games when that wasn’t really the thing to worry about during the 16, 32, and 128 bit eras. Usually, if it was a big game, all you had to worry about was if it was good or not. Any found glitches were icing on the cake, regardless of the quality of the game.