PS Vita TV - Thoughts?

Discussion in 'PlayStation Vita General Discussion' started by Jawessome, Jan 5, 2014.

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Will You Buy A PS Vita TV (US/EU edition)?

  1. No question about it.

    8 vote(s)
    53.3%
  2. I may wait to see the price and final compatibility

    7 vote(s)
    46.7%
  1. vongruetz
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    vongruetz Well-Known Member

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    The VitaTV right now is full of so much potential, and if Sony plays its cards right, it could be the future of PlayStation.
    At first it will be a small, cheap gaming console that will let you play PSP, PSone, and select PS Vita games. It will also let you stream video services such as Netflix and YouTube. You can watch movies, listen to music, or even browse the web. It will also be portable. Going on vacation? Throw the VitaTV and a couple controllers in your suitcase and play some great games with the family in your hotel room. You can put it in the kids' playroom so they can watch Netflix and play games. One of the great things the PSone had that the PS3 and Vita don't have is a load of kid friendly games. My daughter is 7 and she loves the PS3, but mainly because she likes playing the old Spyro and Toy Story games from the PSone.
    Later down the road the VitaTV will get patched to support the Dualshock 4 and have remote play capability. This will mean that you can suddenly have a second PS4 in your house without having to spend another $400. Right now I have two PS3s because there are two different rooms I game in. The VitaTV then becomes an inexpensive extender for the PS4 to other TVs in the house.
    Then even further down the road they patch in PS Now. This allows the VitaTV to become the one console to rule them all. It will take time, and there will be a lot of hiccups getting PS Now to work smoothly. But they'll get there. Suddenly this $99 box can not only play PSP, Vita, and PSone games, but also PS3 and potentially PS4 games as well.

    In order to get there however, Sony needs to do some things right.
    First, they can't let low sales figures in Japan deter them from pushing this thing forward. Japan is a handheld-centric gaming nation, and it probably wasn't going to be huge there anyway. This is a device that needs to be pushed in the West where people spend more game time in front of TVs. Also, the low sales are a reflection that a lot of the potential for this system isn't here yet. Once the PS4 integration happens, the value of a VitaTV increases exponentially.

    Secondly, if you look at my list of benefits for the VitaTV you'll notice they all have something in common. They're all benefits for adult gamers who probably have families as well. Don't market this thing as the solution for 20-something hipsters. The group of college buddies sitting on a couch playing CoD are not going to want this thing. Go for the older gamer. Market it to guys in their 30's and 40's. I think it's a market segment that is often overlooked.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2014
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  2. akhi216
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    akhi216 Well-Known Member

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    I am interested in getting one as a PS Now streambox.
     
  3. Flying_Pig
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    Flying_Pig Well-Known Member

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    See, I actually think Vita TV's primary purpose is pretty clear. It's a micro-games console which can play Vita, PSP and PSOne games. There have been quite a few Android micro-consoles, but most have been very poor and they lack a decent library of quality games.

    Vita TV has the games library to kick all of those other consoles into touch.

    But then you can add the potential benefits oft the system too as outlined by vongruetz - namely TV streamer, PS4 streamer, PS Now player.

    I do agree that Sony haven't explained it very clearly to the mass market and maybe they're holding back a release in the US and Europe until PSNow is up and running, but it could be a pretty significant step for Sony
     
  4. vongruetz
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    vongruetz Well-Known Member

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    No, the Vita TV isn't for everyone, but there is a market for this device. It's a device that will deliver certain services, but those services aren't ready just yet. It's hardware that is waiting for the software to catch up. There are a number of devices like AppleTV, Roku, and other devices that do similar things. What the Vita TV does is it adds a gaming component to it as well. I would buy it for remote play alone. $99 to be able to play my PS4 in another room without having to buy another PS4? That's fantastic. I want it because there are games I own for the Vita that I'd love to play on my TV (like Dragon's Crown). And eventually it will PS Now which means you don't have to buy a PS3 or PS4. You can play all the games and the price of entry is $99 instead of $300-400.

    This device isn't like that little rolling ball that plays music at parties or the camera stand that randomly takes pictures. It's the answer to the innovator's dilemma in the video game industry, and somehow Sony released the thing. Now they just need to follow through.
     
  5. vongruetz
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    vongruetz Well-Known Member

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    Yep, I think we're talking about different things. You're arguing about where they are and what they're doing, I'm seeing it from where it could go and what it should be.
    Right now Sony is trying to position it as a media streaming device for the Japanese market. They want it to be an inexpensive way for people to connect to Music Unlimited and Video Unlimited. The fact that it can play games is just a bonus. I can understand their thinking (somewhat). Apparently dedicated media streaming devices really haven't taken off in Japan yet, so Sony feels they should enter that market. Then instead of doing R&D to develop a new device, they could essentially just take a Vita, strip out the controls and screen, and use that. The OS is already there, the components are already there. Then you add in the other functions of the Vita (such as game support) as an extra. The fact that it could possibly do Remote Play and PS Now are two things that I don't think they initially were thinking about. That's why they said they were so surprised that it had such a reaction from people in the West. They pitched a media streaming box and we saw a game streaming box, whether it's PS4 streaming or PS Now. Now Sony just has to realize that the device they have isn't the device they thought they were making, but it's probably better.

    As for the innovator's dilemma, it's a concept fleshed out in Clayton Christensen's book "The Innovator's Dilemma." It looks into the trends behind disruptive technologies and how they usually start off as small niche products that are misunderstood by the mass market until something suddenly clicks and it takes off. I recommend giving it a read. It's a little repetitive at times, but it's really interesting.
     

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